Long overdue: Where I’ve been lately

“I am my own worst critic.”

As much as we hate reading this overused phrase, it’s true among most.

Okay. I have to be completely honest. If I didn’t game so much, I’d have enough time to blog. No excuses this time. I admit that I play PS4 more than I should.

However, I do make time for writing. Managing my own projects have not stopped, which brings me to good news. I have completed a flash fiction collection. I created a book cover using a royalty-free photo, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe InDesign. Using InDesign, I converted an .indd file into an .epub and .pdf. Technically, the book is ready to go for mobile devices, but I decided to make a book for print as well. Its still not finished. It’ll take me a week or two to decide what the back cover design should look like.

I edited those stories over and over until I saw no errors. It still needs a reader to critique it though.

 

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Net Neutrality: How it affects us?

For the past few days, I’ve seen the alerts about Net Neutrality. Every banner I’ve seen is in all caps alerting the internet surfer that their viewership will change. I didn’t believe it. I thought it was just another minuscule issue that didn’t affect the average, everyday person.

WHAT IS NET NEUTRALITY?

Net neutrality is prevents ISPs from speeding up, slowing down, or blocking any content, blocking applications or blocking websites a consumer wants to use.

To clarify: Internet service providers are required to treat all internet traffic equally.

Apparently it will not only affect how you view the internet, but it will affect how much an ISP consumer will pay. After doing some extensive research, I found that net neutrality is a rule in which internet service providers are restricted from charging extra fees for certain content; in addition, ISPs aren’t allowed to block websites or slow internet speed to specific content. In other words, an ISP can’t slow speeds to content systems (like Netflix) or show favoritism for their own content.

On Tuesday, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai announced that there will be a vote to totally repeal the Obama Administration rule on network neutrality. Supporters of net neutrality urge that the rule gives an even playing field between content creators and large corporations. Also, it provides an affordable cost to most consumers.

The repeal of net neutrality would dismantle those restrictions on ISPs. Pai says that the repeal will allow to make investments in rural and low income areas.

In all honesty, I don’t believe ISPs aren’t concerned about making investments in these areas but rather earn more profits. It’s sensible. Every business wants to make profit. So far, the average American has shined through the current net neutrality rule. Services like Steam has a chance to host indie creator content without a high cost to ISPs. Companies, large and small, have a fair shot at sharing and selling content.

In the words of Bernie Mac, “This some ol’ bull!”

Even though ISP executives are against the net neutrality rule, they still receive profits each year. They’re not losing money. How does the repeal help small business? The purpose of the repeal is vague. That could mean Pai doesn’t know what he’s talking about or he’s covering up a hidden agenda.

If the vote is passed to repeal net neutrality, I hope the ISPs have the integrity not to overcharge their customers or charge their customers unnecessary fees to access content. We’ll just have to see how the next few days play out.

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO?

At the moment, all we can do is make it known to the public officials who represent us in government. Voices are heard. If enough people show protest against the repeal, it could possibly sway the vote to go in the direction that benefits the consumer. This is a democracy after all.

Join the conversation.

The Truth about Self-Publishing

I’m so psyched about self-publishing. I’m holding myself back because producing a book without another round of edits could hurt. Investing in an editor appears to be the right thing to do along side purchasing copyrights from the Library of Congress.

Two obstacles remain: Money and more stories.

Any writer or any professional will tell you to keep your job while you’re writing novels, collections, etc. I know I’ll have to take a risk eventually, but I want it to be a calculated risk.

Day 7: Coffee of the Day

The blog of the day is…

…If we were having coffee, it would be the witching hour. Around 5 a.m., occasionally, I grab a small Styrofoam cup. I fill it one-fourth way with sugar and cream. The more exotic the cream flavor the better. As long as its not peppermint or double chocolate.

I seize the coffee urn, tipping it slowly. I hold it at a specific angle because the stream often runs down the side of the urn. I never succeed. I pretend the coffee doesn’t spill and blame the person who pours the next serving.

The dark blend morphs into a caramel-color. I inhale the steam. Decent. The taste: Sweet. Caffeine is buried by the sugar, weariness drains the will to remain awake. I’m tempted to get another cup. Time is winding down, so I wait for breakfast before I decide to put something else in my stomach.

The morning shift is done, and the coffee has left me with a bubbly stomach ache. The next day, a co-worker brings an exotic blend: Pumpkin Spice. I envision the routine from the previous day.

If we’re having coffee we’re directing the news.

Tonight the challenge ends. I’d like to thank the Write Tribe for challenging me and other bloggers to find the edge we needed to blog daily. Maybe I’ll take on another challenge to keep myself busy. Also, I’d like to thank those that like, share, and/or read my blog posts. I’ll be sure to do the same.

 

Day 6: Guest Post Flop

I wanted to feature a guest post. My efforts have flopped today. But that doesn’t mean it’s the end of the fun.

The challenge has been a great way to show off my writing skills, which I hope is good for you all.

Also, I’m gravitating toward more story ideas. Eventually, I’ll have to produce something. I may take the CreateSpace route when investing into editing. I feel like I need more. Maybe I should take more risks. I just want to create enough content that everyone can enjoy.

Day 5: The Unsent Love Letter

Dear ___________,

Retrospect has brought some fond memories. In the midst of youth, there were times where my heart fluttered yet I was too distracted to notice.

I didn’t understand it as a kid in elementary school. The first girl I liked was liked by most of the boys in 5th grade. She loved dolphins and wrote about it in a class activity. At the opportunity to impress her, I ended up annoying her.

You probably don’t remember. I felt bad and wanted to apologize. Somehow, I understood pride. Courage, however, was far from me.

I knew my chances were over. So, my young mind wondered to a girl who just arrived to our school. I had big crush on her. But most of my friends liked her, too. When I didn’t get any attention, I made it business to show everyone I didn’t like her. Inside my little naive heart, I adored her.

I was mean to you for no reason. I had a crush on you for sure. Every snarky look was out of boyish infatuation. Typical yet truthful.

I had a crush in middle school. It was mutual, at least it felt mutual. I was so caught up in being tough. I found my macho bravado but lacked the courage to tell the girl I half-ass carried to the nurse’s office that I liked her.

You were as sweet as a ripe peach, so pretty that I was afraid to maim your beauty with my bald, oily fingers.

High school was different. With no car I felt inadequate. I put all of my focus into school. Of course, my crushy vibes continued. It was without measure. It was a race, and I was way behind all the other dudes.

I got bold one day. On Valentine’s Day 2006, I gave my crush a poem. I spelled her name wrong though. How cute. Unfortunately, she was dating someone else.

I should’ve pursued you more. The opportunity like many others went by, and I let it happen.

Most of all, I let a jewel in my adulthood slip away. The boyish habits sustained. The petite beauty persisted. I ignored her thinking only of my selfish desire.

This uncoventional letter, this confessional blunder of words, is regret.

As a kid, I wasn’t supposed to understand the ins and outs of courtship. As an adult, however, I was conscious. I complained about being lonely while the lady that burned for me raised her hand.

Life granted me ambition. I’ve been married to it for a long time. I didn’t think there was enough room for a girlfriend. What I didn’t realize was the room I had within my life. I was selfish.

There was enough room for you.

Although our time has long since passed, I’m here to say that I never forgot you. You left me an impression that I’ll treasure for life. And for that, I thank you.

Cordially,

Elijah