Top 5 Distractions for Writers

Brainstorming the infinite possibilities of a writer’s creativity is fun to talk about, but talking about writing doesn’t put words on the page.

Once the writing process starts, consistency becomes a constant struggle.

These days, technology soaks up most of our time. If our cellphones aren’t in our hands, we’re likely invested into television or a computer screen. Regardless of what it is, technology can be a distraction when we’re trying to get our writing done. But technology isn’t the only detractor that affects our writing.

Consider these factors listed below as known distractors to writers.

1. Internet

The World Wide Web is an essential to research, social marketing, and entertainment. Because of the infinite possibilities, most of us find ourselves shopping or reacting to cute puppy videos.

As fun as creativity is, writing is forced to compete with the ever tempting after thought that just won’t go away until we take a small peek, which can last for hours.

2. Gaming

Those of us who grew up in the era of games understand how captivating video games can be. They are just as fun as any book, comic, or film. Actually, most of these games are derived from these items.

Video games take up as much time as the internet. In combination with story and graphics, games present challenges that frustrate and reward players for long hours of play time. This means more inspiring time but less writing.

There has to be limit. Writers can be both creator and gamer, however, time must be managed effectively to get writing done.

3. Career / Work

The rule of thumb for all writers, fiction and nonfiction, is to never quit a day job.

The reality of a writer is like the reality of a singer. Many are talented, few get through the passage to noteriety. Therefore, it’s important for writers to have a career to ensure they earn a living.

Sometimes, the job chokes our inspiration. Sometimes, writers trade a few hundred words for sleep.

4. Writing at Home

Like any other technological distraction, the humble of bode is just as distracting. We are most comfortable at home, and many of us find something around the house to mess with instead of writing.

Parents face the toughest challenge. Toddlers and pre-teens are awesome but can be more than an arm full. Considering children as a distraction is insensitive, however, it’s going to be a long day to get 200 hundred words on the page when the kids get curious.

5. Writer’s Block

Staring at a blank page is a symptom of writer’s block. It’s the undeniable condition that illustrates how the brain has worn itself out. The words don’t flow as good when they’re forced out, and the classic continuous backspacing leaves the writer just as empty as the blank page.

Writer’s block lock writers into a brainstorm and floods them with deluge of anxiety.

But there is a silver lining at edge of it. Writers should continue writing even if it sounds like they’re sloshing through muddy ideas. Write them down and save them until they’re dry enough to sculpt.

Dealing with Distractions

There’s no avoiding distractions. They will appear and loom over the writer’s shoulder. How writer’s deal with distractions is the true test.

Despite challenges, work load, and anxiety, writers should write on. Conditions are part of the journey that mold writers into excellent story tellers.

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Upcoming Flash Fiction Collection…Should it be free?

Upcoming Flash Fiction Collection…Should it be free?

After much consideration, I’ve decided to give readers an appetizer of fiction through eBook hosting services such as Amazon and iBooks.

I’ve been sitting on 10,000 plus words of flash fiction the last few years. I posted them to Fiction Press before, but I was too indecisive on whether they should be on the site.

Update: I have decided to sit on this project. I want to focus on writing and editing more projects.

Writing for Professionals

Creativity is never a problem for the fiction writer. Earning a sustainable wage solely as a writer is a dream for fiction and nonfiction authors. That dream, however, takes time to establish. Therefore, it’s important to keep a job, part-time or full-time, while one pursues such an ambition.

In the past few years, I’ve targeted professional writing and editing opportunities through job boards like Indeed and Upwork (previously Elance).

Writing for clients, though not unfamiliar, is a different world. The principles of writing and editing remain consistent, but each industry has its own writing style, subtlties one might not notice if he or she is not familiar with a particular field of study or industry.

Freelance writers and editors outside those particular industries have to learn them as they acquire clients.

Like any business, there is a slow season. At the moment, I’m in a stand still. I apply. I wait. I try again. What can I expect? The market is full of professionals, and I can’t blame clients for choosing a freelancer who works more frequently than most.

Instead, I’ve been trying to create professional writing content such as technical guides and white papers to attract clients and illustrate my versatile writing skills.

It’s a great idea, but I keep hitting the wall of writer’s block. I miss the days of having a prompt to work with.

Day 7: Coffee of the Day

The blog of the day is…

…If we were having coffee, it would be the witching hour. Around 5 a.m., occasionally, I grab a small Styrofoam cup. I fill it one-fourth way with sugar and cream. The more exotic the cream flavor the better. As long as its not peppermint or double chocolate.

I seize the coffee urn, tipping it slowly. I hold it at a specific angle because the stream often runs down the side of the urn. I never succeed. I pretend the coffee doesn’t spill and blame the person who pours the next serving.

The dark blend morphs into a caramel-color. I inhale the steam. Decent. The taste: Sweet. Caffeine is buried by the sugar, weariness drains the will to remain awake. I’m tempted to get another cup. Time is winding down, so I wait for breakfast before I decide to put something else in my stomach.

The morning shift is done, and the coffee has left me with a bubbly stomach ache. The next day, a co-worker brings an exotic blend: Pumpkin Spice. I envision the routine from the previous day.

If we’re having coffee we’re directing the news.

Tonight the challenge ends. I’d like to thank the Write Tribe for challenging me and other bloggers to find the edge we needed to blog daily. Maybe I’ll take on another challenge to keep myself busy. Also, I’d like to thank those that like, share, and/or read my blog posts. I’ll be sure to do the same.

 

Day 6: Guest Post Flop

I wanted to feature a guest post. My efforts have flopped today. But that doesn’t mean it’s the end of the fun.

The challenge has been a great way to show off my writing skills, which I hope is good for you all.

Also, I’m gravitating toward more story ideas. Eventually, I’ll have to produce something. I may take the CreateSpace route when investing into editing. I feel like I need more. Maybe I should take more risks. I just want to create enough content that everyone can enjoy.

Day 5: The Unsent Love Letter

Dear ___________,

Retrospect has brought some fond memories. In the midst of youth, there were times where my heart fluttered yet I was too distracted to notice.

I didn’t understand it as a kid in elementary school. The first girl I liked was liked by most of the boys in 5th grade. She loved dolphins and wrote about it in a class activity. At the opportunity to impress her, I ended up annoying her.

You probably don’t remember. I felt bad and wanted to apologize. Somehow, I understood pride. Courage, however, was far from me.

I knew my chances were over. So, my young mind wondered to a girl who just arrived to our school. I had big crush on her. But most of my friends liked her, too. When I didn’t get any attention, I made it business to show everyone I didn’t like her. Inside my little naive heart, I adored her.

I was mean to you for no reason. I had a crush on you for sure. Every snarky look was out of boyish infatuation. Typical yet truthful.

I had a crush in middle school. It was mutual, at least it felt mutual. I was so caught up in being tough. I found my macho bravado but lacked the courage to tell the girl I half-ass carried to the nurse’s office that I liked her.

You were as sweet as a ripe peach, so pretty that I was afraid to maim your beauty with my bald, oily fingers.

High school was different. With no car I felt inadequate. I put all of my focus into school. Of course, my crushy vibes continued. It was without measure. It was a race, and I was way behind all the other dudes.

I got bold one day. On Valentine’s Day 2006, I gave my crush a poem. I spelled her name wrong though. How cute. Unfortunately, she was dating someone else.

I should’ve pursued you more. The opportunity like many others went by, and I let it happen.

Most of all, I let a jewel in my adulthood slip away. The boyish habits sustained. The petite beauty persisted. I ignored her thinking only of my selfish desire.

This uncoventional letter, this confessional blunder of words, is regret.

As a kid, I wasn’t supposed to understand the ins and outs of courtship. As an adult, however, I was conscious. I complained about being lonely while the lady that burned for me raised her hand.

Life granted me ambition. I’ve been married to it for a long time. I didn’t think there was enough room for a girlfriend. What I didn’t realize was the room I had within my life. I was selfish.

There was enough room for you.

Although our time has long since passed, I’m here to say that I never forgot you. You left me an impression that I’ll treasure for life. And for that, I thank you.

Cordially,

Elijah