Why Students should not Hire Freelancers to Write Essays?

No one in an undergrad or post-grad program can escape essays.

Essays are effective tests that shows comprehension of the subject matter.

Students who hire freelance writers to write their essays for them are committing plagiarism.

Professors can spot this. They survey your writing through quizzes, tests, or small writing samples just to see a student’s unique voice.

For freelancers, it’s money in the bank. However, it enables academic dishonesty among students. Participating does not bode well. A passing grade is not promised after an essay is completed and money has been distributed. Procrastinating creates tight deadlines and rushed research writing, which likely result in a failing grade. In addition, freelancers risk their reputations as writers and editors.

Let’s not forget, there are serious consequences for academic dishonesty. Each college or university deals with academic integrity differently. Referring to your student code of conduct for a loop hole will not work. Integrity is a universal code among educators.

Ultimately, you should utilize the resources provided by your institutions. These services are included in your tuition. Take advantage of them. The only thing left to spent is time.

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Top 5 Distractions for Writers

Brainstorming the infinite possibilities of a writer’s creativity is fun to talk about, but talking about writing doesn’t put words on the page.

Once the writing process starts, consistency becomes a constant struggle.

These days, technology soaks up most of our time. If our cellphones aren’t in our hands, we’re likely invested into television or a computer screen. Regardless of what it is, technology can be a distraction when we’re trying to get our writing done. But technology isn’t the only detractor that affects our writing.

Consider these factors listed below as known distractors to writers.

1. Internet

The World Wide Web is an essential to research, social marketing, and entertainment. Because of the infinite possibilities, most of us find ourselves shopping or reacting to cute puppy videos.

As fun as creativity is, writing is forced to compete with the ever tempting after thought that just won’t go away until we take a small peek, which can last for hours.

2. Gaming

Those of us who grew up in the era of games understand how captivating video games can be. They are just as fun as any book, comic, or film. Actually, most of these games are derived from these items.

Video games take up as much time as the internet. In combination with story and graphics, games present challenges that frustrate and reward players for long hours of play time. This means more inspiring time but less writing.

There has to be limit. Writers can be both creator and gamer, however, time must be managed effectively to get writing done.

3. Career / Work

The rule of thumb for all writers, fiction and nonfiction, is to never quit a day job.

The reality of a writer is like the reality of a singer. Many are talented, few get through the passage to noteriety. Therefore, it’s important for writers to have a career to ensure they earn a living.

Sometimes, the job chokes our inspiration. Sometimes, writers trade a few hundred words for sleep.

4. Writing at Home

Like any other technological distraction, the humble of bode is just as distracting. We are most comfortable at home, and many of us find something around the house to mess with instead of writing.

Parents face the toughest challenge. Toddlers and pre-teens are awesome but can be more than an arm full. Considering children as a distraction is insensitive, however, it’s going to be a long day to get 200 hundred words on the page when the kids get curious.

5. Writer’s Block

Staring at a blank page is a symptom of writer’s block. It’s the undeniable condition that illustrates how the brain has worn itself out. The words don’t flow as good when they’re forced out, and the classic continuous backspacing leaves the writer just as empty as the blank page.

Writer’s block lock writers into a brainstorm and floods them with deluge of anxiety.

But there is a silver lining at edge of it. Writers should continue writing even if it sounds like they’re sloshing through muddy ideas. Write them down and save them until they’re dry enough to sculpt.

Dealing with Distractions

There’s no avoiding distractions. They will appear and loom over the writer’s shoulder. How writer’s deal with distractions is the true test.

Despite challenges, work load, and anxiety, writers should write on. Conditions are part of the journey that mold writers into excellent story tellers.

Writing for Professionals

Creativity is never a problem for the fiction writer. Earning a sustainable wage solely as a writer is a dream for fiction and nonfiction authors. That dream, however, takes time to establish. Therefore, it’s important to keep a job, part-time or full-time, while one pursues such an ambition.

In the past few years, I’ve targeted professional writing and editing opportunities through job boards like Indeed and Upwork (previously Elance).

Writing for clients, though not unfamiliar, is a different world. The principles of writing and editing remain consistent, but each industry has its own writing style, subtlties one might not notice if he or she is not familiar with a particular field of study or industry.

Freelance writers and editors outside those particular industries have to learn them as they acquire clients.

Like any business, there is a slow season. At the moment, I’m in a stand still. I apply. I wait. I try again. What can I expect? The market is full of professionals, and I can’t blame clients for choosing a freelancer who works more frequently than most.

Instead, I’ve been trying to create professional writing content such as technical guides and white papers to attract clients and illustrate my versatile writing skills.

It’s a great idea, but I keep hitting the wall of writer’s block. I miss the days of having a prompt to work with.

The Truth about Self-Publishing

I’m so psyched about self-publishing. I’m holding myself back because producing a book without another round of edits could hurt. Investing in an editor appears to be the right thing to do along side purchasing copyrights from the Library of Congress.

Two obstacles remain: Money and more stories.

Any writer or any professional will tell you to keep your job while you’re writing novels, collections, etc. I know I’ll have to take a risk eventually, but I want it to be a calculated risk.

Is it too late to learn?

Never!

If there’s life in the body, there is no “too late” to learn. I asked myself this once when I got out of college. I’m sure many shared the same thing, “Got a degree but can’t find the job to use it.” The career bust is a stagnant breath minx staunching the moisture of success on pricks of its tongue. We must deal with it. Despite the clouds, we pray for the bright silver lining. We hope for the trickle of rain against the soil of our aspirations.

To give up is the acceptance of wasteland. Like the Earth, the mind requires us to till and plant the seeds of knowledge.

Whenever I complete story or chapter, I take a small break from writing and turn my attention to building skills. Sites like Youtube host many tutorial videos on how to use the different computing software, cooking tips, etc.

Nothing captured my attention. I was used to storytelling. I knew there was another way to do it. So, I thought about my video game hobby. And one of the ways I could tell a story was through video editing and video effects. I recorded video game footage then edited them into a montage.

I started watching tutorials on Adobe After Effects and Adobe Premiere. The information was overwhelming. The pits of my stomach turned. Regret reminded of all the times I could’ve engaged in something practical.

I worked through it using my video game hobby to keep my mind submerged into learning until I was familiar with the basics of After Effects and Premiere. Once I understood the Adobe Suite, I began using more advanced maneuvers.

I encourage anyone who seeks to learn a new skill, instrument, etc. to venture into the world of information to learn whatever supplements your career or life purpose.

How to have a Good College Experience

If you haven’t moved already, you’re a few days away before you enter into the best experience of your life: college.

For some of you, this will be the longest time you’ve been away from home. Some feelings of sadness and excitement will meld together.

I’m here to give you some pointers on how to enjoy your collegiate years.

1. Make Friends

Being away from home can bring home sickness. It’s essential that you mingle with everyone. That includes roommates, neighbors, and classmates. Once you connect with people, you’ll forget about your home sickness.

2. Establish Boundaries

As you mingle, you will want to set some boundaries on who come to your room. Ladies, don’t invite guys to your room or visit his room right away. Establish trust first.

The second is food. Raiding your roommate’s food stash is one of the rudest things you can do in college. Ask and you shall receive… Sometimes.

3. Social and Collegiate Balance

There’s no question about it. Hanging out with people who enjoy the same things you do is a blast. And time flies when you’re having fun. The semester will fly by before you know it, so it’s important to focus on what your money is paying for.

Have a time where you party and have a time where you study.

4. Getting a Job

If you can handle a part-time job while in college, go for it. You’d be surprised how much money you’ll make in a year. That’ll give some relief to parents that may send you money and it prepares you for the real world.

Landing part-time job in your field of study is gold. The transition after college will definitely help your career pursuit.

5. Learn Career Skills in College

This applies to all colleges students. Take advantage of your college resources and learn skills outside of your field of study. Some students can double major or pick up a minor.

If that’s not an option, get involved with student clubs, volunteering, or inquire professors about the industry you want to enter.

Be an intern as well. It’s effective on a resume. Employers do consider you more if you intern with them.

6. Collaborate ideas with Other Students

As your social circle gets bigger, use this time to collaborate creative ideas with your friends and fellow students. Entities like Youtube, Twitch, Facebook, etc. is home to free promotion and expression of creativity. Who knows what it might turn into.

7. Find the Fun in Course Work

Homework, reading, and papers feel like a chore sometimes. The “chore” feeling can damage the quality of your hard work. You’ll be trying hard to get course work done rather than working on whether it’s done correctly. Lack of clarity can keep you away from A’s. No A’s hurts your GPA.

Did I forget something? Or do you have a question? Comment your questions and tips below, and I’ll answer as honest as possible.

Do Hiring Managers Really Read Resumes?

It’s no secret. Some of us have our degrees with aspirations of entering an industry that we studied for or still studying for. The truth to career life is that you never know what it holds. Life is like a box of Raisinets, you never know which one is a raisin or a small marble of cocoa that missed its target.

And sometimes we miss. Job seekers go through education sifting through the process waiting on the machine to coat us with something scrumptious. We roll past other raisins thinking we’d get there first. Somehow, we get into wrong position and fall right off the periphery, missing the key component that makes us attractive.

So what do we do? We get up, dust off, and get back in the mix hoping to get picked.

Resumes are a lot like that. They start out  dried out and blank waiting patiently for the job seeker to put something delicious on its person. The brainstorm spins a tasty morsel in a bowl of memories, which job seekers drizzle neatly over the page. Voila.

Apply. Submit. Into the box it goes with other resumes wanting to be reviewed. Hopefully they’re taken serious.

Out of the batch, hiring managers select each piece–tasting each one and deciding which Raisinet was the best. But when you eat a Raisinet, do you really measure which one is best? Sadly enough, resumes are treated the same.

Sometimes that resume we spent all week to prepare is consumed without much thought. Does that mean job seekers should stop writing resumes and cover letters? No. It simply means that we have improve our recipe.

That’s why most recommend that resumes be one page–it’s short and sweet, a delicate quickness that’s appreciated and missed almost instantly. If it tastes great, the hiring manager will hum on it savoring it on their taste buds. That desire to savor the taste is the phone call or response email we get after we’ve applied for the job.

So do employers actually read our resumes? Yes. But not all of them considered. Don’t get discouraged. Keep exploring ways to improve.