Is it too late to learn?

Never!

If there’s life in the body, there is no “too late” to learn. I asked myself this once when I got out of college. I’m sure many shared the same thing, “Got a degree but can’t find the job to use it.” The career bust is a stagnant breath minx staunching the moisture of success on pricks of its tongue. We must deal with it. Despite the clouds, we pray for the bright silver lining. We hope for the trickle of rain against the soil of our aspirations.

To give up is the acceptance of wasteland. Like the Earth, the mind requires us to till and plant the seeds of knowledge.

Whenever I complete story or chapter, I take a small break from writing and turn my attention to building skills. Sites like Youtube host many tutorial videos on how to use the different computing software, cooking tips, etc.

Nothing captured my attention. I was used to storytelling. I knew there was another way to do it. So, I thought about my video game hobby. And one of the ways I could tell a story was through video editing and video effects. I recorded video game footage then edited them into a montage.

I started watching tutorials on Adobe After Effects and Adobe Premiere. The information was overwhelming. The pits of my stomach turned. Regret reminded of all the times I could’ve engaged in something practical.

I worked through it using my video game hobby to keep my mind submerged into learning until I was familiar with the basics of After Effects and Premiere. Once I understood the Adobe Suite, I began using more advanced maneuvers.

I encourage anyone who seeks to learn a new skill, instrument, etc. to venture into the world of information to learn whatever supplements your career or life purpose.

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How to have a Good College Experience

If you haven’t moved already, you’re a few days away before you enter into the best experience of your life: college.

For some of you, this will be the longest time you’ve been away from home. Some feelings of sadness and excitement will meld together.

I’m here to give you some pointers on how to enjoy your collegiate years.

1. Make Friends

Being away from home can bring home sickness. It’s essential that you mingle with everyone. That includes roommates, neighbors, and classmates. Once you connect with people, you’ll forget about your home sickness.

2. Establish Boundaries

As you mingle, you will want to set some boundaries on who come to your room. Ladies, don’t invite guys to your room or visit his room right away. Establish trust first.

The second is food. Raiding your roommate’s food stash is one of the rudest things you can do in college. Ask and you shall receive… Sometimes.

3. Social and Collegiate Balance

There’s no question about it. Hanging out with people who enjoy the same things you do is a blast. And time flies when you’re having fun. The semester will fly by before you know it, so it’s important to focus on what your money is paying for.

Have a time where you party and have a time where you study.

4. Getting a Job

If you can handle a part-time job while in college, go for it. You’d be surprised how much money you’ll make in a year. That’ll give some relief to parents that may send you money and it prepares you for the real world.

Landing part-time job in your field of study is gold. The transition after college will definitely help your career pursuit.

5. Learn Career Skills in College

This applies to all colleges students. Take advantage of your college resources and learn skills outside of your field of study. Some students can double major or pick up a minor.

If that’s not an option, get involved with student clubs, volunteering, or inquire professors about the industry you want to enter.

Be an intern as well. It’s effective on a resume. Employers do consider you more if you intern with them.

6. Collaborate ideas with Other Students

As your social circle gets bigger, use this time to collaborate creative ideas with your friends and fellow students. Entities like Youtube, Twitch, Facebook, etc. is home to free promotion and expression of creativity. Who knows what it might turn into.

7. Find the Fun in Course Work

Homework, reading, and papers feel like a chore sometimes. The “chore” feeling can damage the quality of your hard work. You’ll be trying hard to get course work done rather than working on whether it’s done correctly. Lack of clarity can keep you away from A’s. No A’s hurts your GPA.

Did I forget something? Or do you have a question? Comment your questions and tips below, and I’ll answer as honest as possible.

Do Hiring Managers Really Read Resumes?

It’s no secret. Some of us have our degrees with aspirations of entering an industry that we studied for or still studying for. The truth to career life is that you never know what it holds. Life is like a box of Raisinets, you never know which one is a raisin or a small marble of cocoa that missed its target.

And sometimes we miss. Job seekers go through education sifting through the process waiting on the machine to coat us with something scrumptious. We roll past other raisins thinking we’d get there first. Somehow, we get into wrong position and fall right off the periphery, missing the key component that makes us attractive.

So what do we do? We get up, dust off, and get back in the mix hoping to get picked.

Resumes are a lot like that. They start out  dried out and blank waiting patiently for the job seeker to put something delicious on its person. The brainstorm spins a tasty morsel in a bowl of memories, which job seekers drizzle neatly over the page. Voila.

Apply. Submit. Into the box it goes with other resumes wanting to be reviewed. Hopefully they’re taken serious.

Out of the batch, hiring managers select each piece–tasting each one and deciding which Raisinet was the best. But when you eat a Raisinet, do you really measure which one is best? Sadly enough, resumes are treated the same.

Sometimes that resume we spent all week to prepare is consumed without much thought. Does that mean job seekers should stop writing resumes and cover letters? No. It simply means that we have improve our recipe.

That’s why most recommend that resumes be one page–it’s short and sweet, a delicate quickness that’s appreciated and missed almost instantly. If it tastes great, the hiring manager will hum on it savoring it on their taste buds. That desire to savor the taste is the phone call or response email we get after we’ve applied for the job.

So do employers actually read our resumes? Yes. But not all of them considered. Don’t get discouraged. Keep exploring ways to improve.

 

Letter to the Undergrad

Hello Undergrad Student(s),

Don’t take this the wrong way, but your career is going to suck if you don’t arm yourself with as many skills as possible.

The purpose of this letter is a warning. Be careful. Don’t take your college career for granted or you’ll be going a through loop trying to figure out what you should’ve done while you were in college.

I know this because I believed that one degree would opened all the doors for me. It’s not like that any more. Bachelor’s degrees are a dime a dozen. These days, a person must be a jack of all trades.

Use your resources. Professors are not just there to piss you off, they get you ready for the rugged edges of rejection and bluntness from employers. Unpaid internships does put a damper on finances, but they can help build experience, which is just as valuable as education. Hoard professional experience. The more you have the better your job search will be.

Let go of your entitlement issues. Take the stick out of your ass, you got student loans to pay. If rejection bothers you then bitterness will be your best friend. And its a crappy friend that throws blame at everyone. Misfortune and scarcity is life’s way of preparing you for the hurtful moments to come.

Appreciate these great times in college. Use them wisely. Use those expensive books that miraculously become cheap at the end of the semester. Actually, keep those books, they’re great references for the trials ahead.

Stay focused.

Cordially,

 

 

Elijah B.

 

 

Marketing: How does one “sell” oneself?

I guess I can say the only thing in my life I sold was candy, particularly in grade school. Do you remember the selling contest schools had to raise money? I remember signing up to raise money, and I filled out this form to sell M&Ms and Reese Cups to raise funds for a field trip. It never worked because I eventually ate the candy they gave me.

Candy is sweet, it’s the guilty pleasure of the healthy and a regular meal for those with a meticulous sweet tooth. It sells better than sex…Maybe not that much.

In the career world, selling yourself is tough, to say the least. Persuasion is your best weapon, but some edges of persuasion are like dusty gemstones every person has to polish in order to land a job.

Even with a glimmer, you have to appeal to the employer and know how to stunt your glow. That’s the issue I’m having today. I know I have the luminous aura of a professional but something is eclipsing it.

It could be a unclear resume, a mediocre cover letter, or perhaps experience. Lately, I’ve been getting hit with the inexperience song and dance.

I’m good with first impressions, though, so I’ve been told. Dialogue is my bread and butter for sure. I just have to implement that into the resume and cover letter.

Career FAQs say:

“Offering solutions to these problems is a great way to overcome a lack of directly applicable experience. Be prepared to back up your claims about your skills or characteristics with relevant and specific stories. Avoid complaining about a former employer or laying blame at a former manager’s feet — doing so will likely make you seem difficult to work with (or disloyal).”

-Monster.com’s Career Advice

Sure it’s good advice; however, it’s up to the individual to perform it effectively. But there’s no harm in giving it a shot. The worst answer is “no”.

I should be handle that.

Elijah B.