Marketing: How does one “sell” oneself?

I guess I can say the only thing in my life I sold was candy, particularly in grade school. Do you remember the selling contest schools had to raise money? I remember signing up to raise money, and I filled out this form to sell M&Ms and Reese Cups to raise funds for a field trip. It never worked because I eventually ate the candy they gave me.

Candy is sweet, it’s the guilty pleasure of the healthy and a regular meal for those with a meticulous sweet tooth. It sells better than sex…Maybe not that much.

In the career world, selling yourself is tough, to say the least. Persuasion is your best weapon, but some edges of persuasion are like dusty gemstones every person has to polish in order to land a job.

Even with a glimmer, you have to appeal to the employer and know how to stunt your glow. That’s the issue I’m having today. I know I have the luminous aura of a professional but something is eclipsing it.

It could be a unclear resume, a mediocre cover letter, or perhaps experience. Lately, I’ve been getting hit with the inexperience song and dance.

I’m good with first impressions, though, so I’ve been told. Dialogue is my bread and butter for sure. I just have to implement that into the resume and cover letter.

Career FAQs say:

“Offering solutions to these problems is a great way to overcome a lack of directly applicable experience. Be prepared to back up your claims about your skills or characteristics with relevant and specific stories. Avoid complaining about a former employer or laying blame at a former manager’s feet — doing so will likely make you seem difficult to work with (or disloyal).”

-Monster.com’s Career Advice

Sure it’s good advice; however, it’s up to the individual to perform it effectively. But there’s no harm in giving it a shot. The worst answer is “no”.

I should be handle that.

Elijah B.

Oscars: The Giraffe in the Room

I wanted to ignore this, but the news of the Oscars lack of diversity is everywhere! I initially wanted to keep things like this away from my blog. I guess news and news, right?

As many of you know, or may not know, the Oscars is an annual event where the entertainment industry shows their appreciation for the actors, filmmakers, writers, etc. For the second consecutive year, the Oscars has yet to nominate a non-Caucasian person. Despite one of the owners of the Oscars being a black woman, social media has taken a critical eye to the tradition.

It’s caused quite a stir. Celebrities like Jada Pinkett Smith and Spike Lee are calling for African Americans to boycott the show.

What can you do? Pick a side…? Maybe?

I think the problem isn’t America or the filmmakers or anyone else in entertainment. The problem is tradition.

See we’ve leaned on tradition so long that it feels right. Now that we’re aware and sensitive to just about anything, and the things in our traditions are starting to raise questions. Why?

Why are all the nominees white? Why do people care so much?

To me, the Oscars is a prestigious tradition selecting the most authentic and most talented in film. But the ones with the real power here are the viewers. Without the viewers, these films and TV shows would crumble.

Do I think African Americans should boycott? Be like Bobby Brown, it’s your prerogative. If it offends you that the Oscars didn’t nominate any ethnic individuals then don’t watch. Take it a step further, don’t even talk about the Oscars. Turn off your TV.

Will I watch the Oscars? No. That’s because I find my Playstation 4 more entertaining than controversy, dresses, and corny jokes.

You want to change the Oscars. Don’t watch, don’t tweet, and don’t post. When the ratings take a hit then you’ll see change.