Day 7: Coffee of the Day

The blog of the day is…

…If we were having coffee, it would be the witching hour. Around 5 a.m., occasionally, I grab a small Styrofoam cup. I fill it one-fourth way with sugar and cream. The more exotic the cream flavor the better. As long as its not peppermint or double chocolate.

I seize the coffee urn, tipping it slowly. I hold it at a specific angle because the stream often runs down the side of the urn. I never succeed. I pretend the coffee doesn’t spill and blame the person who pours the next serving.

The dark blend morphs into a caramel-color. I inhale the steam. Decent. The taste: Sweet. Caffeine is buried by the sugar, weariness drains the will to remain awake. I’m tempted to get another cup. Time is winding down, so I wait for breakfast before I decide to put something else in my stomach.

The morning shift is done, and the coffee has left me with a bubbly stomach ache. The next day, a co-worker brings an exotic blend: Pumpkin Spice. I envision the routine from the previous day.

If we’re having coffee we’re directing the news.

Tonight the challenge ends. I’d like to thank the Write Tribe for challenging me and other bloggers to find the edge we needed to blog daily. Maybe I’ll take on another challenge to keep myself busy. Also, I’d like to thank those that like, share, and/or read my blog posts. I’ll be sure to do the same.

 

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Recovery

I’m not sure if I posted anything about this, so I’ll just talk about it to cover my tracks.

On December 1, 2015, my stuff was stolen due to my carelessness. I forgot to lock my car door, and my laptop, flash drives, writing guides, camera, and tooth brush was stolen. What hurt the most was the stolen writing that I worked two years on.

It was devastating.

But I recovered.

Currently, I have a new laptop and two more flash drives (one containing some of the rough draft stories I wrote over the two year period).

For the past couple of days, I’ve been reading, editing, and proofreading these stories. Somehow, I’m working faster and more efficient than before, so I guess the setback wasn’t really a setback. In a strange way, by having my stuff stolen, it made me appreciate my work more than ever.

And I’ve noticed my work, my writing is getting better. I wish I had this mind when I left college. But hey, we live and learn, right?

Working People have Boring Lives

“Working people have boring lives.” That’s pretty bold statement to say the least!

But you have to admit, work keeps us busy most of the time. Work is the necessity to keep those utilities running and food on our plates. In addition, its the very thing that makes us tire and complain.

This is why entertainment is important to us. Honestly, it’s why we love controversy so much, so let’s take a moment and give celebrities and reality t.v. a round of applause.

Work. Home. Food and entertainment. Sleep, maybe. Pretty simple, right?

Of course, there’s some in between but not much. Not to say that simple, straight-forward days are bad, they’re just not that exciting. First responders are the exception. Adrenaline has to be set to holy hell with those people.

For those at the desk, in security, or something like this, life can be uneventful unless you’re a drug dealer (Was it a good joke? No…Sorry). Perhaps, it’s up to the individual to insert excitement into their lives.

Me personally, I like random searches on YouTube. I can be in the middle of something and stop just to watch a two minute segment of Dragon Ball Z. Lame to some, awesome to many.

Again “boring” is not bad at all. It’s routine. It’s Fate on vacation as you live out your life.

As the cliche goes, no news is good news.

Using FictionPress for Exposure

Writing fiction is my passion. It’s the one thing, I wish I could do full-time, but work and bills are two babies that won’t let me get any rest.

Every day, I have this grand idea, which I never write down. When I finally get time to write it, I get distracted with gaming or TV. Procrastination is such an ass.

In between writing projects and two jobs, I get inspired to write stories on FictionPress. If you’re not familiar with FictionPress, check it out here.

FictionPress is a neat website where writers can post their literary work. Its totally free to read each story. Criticism is welcomed by some. And prepare yourself, some of the writing is bad. Trial and error, I suppose.

I have not written any stories over 1000 words, I think. I want to reserve those extensive stories for publication.

If you’re interested in reading or posting stories visit FictionPress.

To read some of my original flash stories visit my FictionPress profile page.

Also, for those that enjoy soliloquies, a YouTube video reading of my horror flash story, “Seaside Hunger”, is located here.

Book Review: Gone Girl, A Novel by Gillian Flynn

Gillian Flynn and her book Gone Girl
Gillian Flynn and her book Gone Girl
Where do I start? I want to keep this review short, but how can I? This book lives up to the reader-writer hype. I admit. I was put off by all the wide-eyed praises. As I read the story, I could feel myself being pulled into cryptic talk, lies, and murder.

So let me begin with themes. Let’s just get the literary devices on the table and how they affect the story.

  • Economy – the novel often visits the characters’ financial standings and how money [it] drives their emotions–a parallel of our reality. Flynn definitely established authenticity there.
  • Unreliable Narrator – my favorite theme throughout the novel is how the narrator’s are not trustworthy. I was immediately pulled into the story especially in the beginning with Nick’s sociopathic, Dexter Morgan-like demeanor.
  • Setting – obvious and well placed. Flynn illustrates setting quite nicely. The reader can see the opportunity and the ever changing city of New York and Carthage, Missouri. Flynn takes her characters to a small, slow point, which they have to recover, however, the madness of Nick and Amy Dunne take them into a spiral of deceit and wrathful daydreams.
  • Family – Universal. Readers can see the drawbacks of a dysfunctional household as well as one that’s “amazing”.

With some of the literary items listed (I’m sure there’s more), allow me to really say what I think:

This book was awesome. The emotional investment I had in this book…my goodness. I wanted to find Jules and Vincent, the hitmen from Pulp Fiction, to pay Nick Dunne a visit. Why not? The man would have been fine if he just told the truth in the beginning. Amy is right, he is a dummy. A big, damn dummy with a hoard of silver tongue fibs that can drive anyone crazy. Thing is Amy was already crazy.

Flynn, you got me. I was on Amy’s side until the bomb she dropped about the diary. I still felt like Nick needs a Ezekiel 25:17 speech. But Amy is crazy, bat crazy. By the way, I hate the phrase “fake it till you make it” and Flynn places it on the tongue of one of the most diabolical women in literature, an appropriate gesture.

I’m glad I read Gone Girl. The author really gave readers a treat. Eloquent. Suspense.

End result: Impressed. As a writer, I will try hard to follow¬†Flynn‘s example.

Purchasing your own ISBN

As I get closer to publishing my first book, I find more information on what I should and should not do.

Honestly, I was going head first into Amazon publishing option. I did more research, and if I really want to indulge in selling books then owning my ISBN is essential.

And here’s why…

Publishing through Amazon will allow me to make money, which I’m all for; however, the free ISBN (or ASIN) Amazon will only work for Amazon. Also, retailers and book clubs that want my book as a hard copy (paperback) may contact my online publisher (Amazon) instead of me, which won’t go well because the ISBN (ASIN) is for the digital copy only. There isn’t much control there.

But if I have my own ISBN, I can sell my book on Amazon as a book published under my own name/company.

When my book becomes more popular, the demand will be high. Then I’ll have to purchase a bar code, which will allow me to sell to retailers and online.

I may have got myself into something here. The road to become an established writer is a long one…