Top 5 Distractions for Writers

Brainstorming the infinite possibilities of a writer’s creativity is fun to talk about, but talking about writing doesn’t put words on the page.

Once the writing process starts, consistency becomes a constant struggle.

These days, technology soaks up most of our time. If our cellphones aren’t in our hands, we’re likely invested into television or a computer screen. Regardless of what it is, technology can be a distraction when we’re trying to get our writing done. But technology isn’t the only detractor that affects our writing.

Consider these factors listed below as known distractors to writers.

1. Internet

The World Wide Web is an essential to research, social marketing, and entertainment. Because of the infinite possibilities, most of us find ourselves shopping or reacting to cute puppy videos.

As fun as creativity is, writing is forced to compete with the ever tempting after thought that just won’t go away until we take a small peek, which can last for hours.

2. Gaming

Those of us who grew up in the era of games understand how captivating video games can be. They are just as fun as any book, comic, or film. Actually, most of these games are derived from these items.

Video games take up as much time as the internet. In combination with story and graphics, games present challenges that frustrate and reward players for long hours of play time. This means more inspiring time but less writing.

There has to be limit. Writers can be both creator and gamer, however, time must be managed effectively to get writing done.

3. Career / Work

The rule of thumb for all writers, fiction and nonfiction, is to never quit a day job.

The reality of a writer is like the reality of a singer. Many are talented, few get through the passage to noteriety. Therefore, it’s important for writers to have a career to ensure they earn a living.

Sometimes, the job chokes our inspiration. Sometimes, writers trade a few hundred words for sleep.

4. Writing at Home

Like any other technological distraction, the humble of bode is just as distracting. We are most comfortable at home, and many of us find something around the house to mess with instead of writing.

Parents face the toughest challenge. Toddlers and pre-teens are awesome but can be more than an arm full. Considering children as a distraction is insensitive, however, it’s going to be a long day to get 200 hundred words on the page when the kids get curious.

5. Writer’s Block

Staring at a blank page is a symptom of writer’s block. It’s the undeniable condition that illustrates how the brain has worn itself out. The words don’t flow as good when they’re forced out, and the classic continuous backspacing leaves the writer just as empty as the blank page.

Writer’s block lock writers into a brainstorm and floods them with deluge of anxiety.

But there is a silver lining at edge of it. Writers should continue writing even if it sounds like they’re sloshing through muddy ideas. Write them down and save them until they’re dry enough to sculpt.

Dealing with Distractions

There’s no avoiding distractions. They will appear and loom over the writer’s shoulder. How writer’s deal with distractions is the true test.

Despite challenges, work load, and anxiety, writers should write on. Conditions are part of the journey that mold writers into excellent story tellers.

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Resume Hell!

Have you ever read FAQs regarding resumes? No matter how many times I read it, I’m still trying to unravel the secret behind a good resume. How can I illustrate a technical document as exciting. It’s like soup, it can’t be too cold, too hot, or overly seasoned. It has to be just right. And every employer has their own preference.

So I have to cook up an appetizer that suits everyone’s palette.

But where do I start? I have the ingredients, but it’s a struggle together. What do you write when you can do just about anything. I’ve tried concentrating it into a specific Writer/Editor resume, but that first attempt was too specific.

I guess I’ll return to the FAQs and trendy skills that relate to my field of study.

 

Consistency…

First off, let me say: HAPPY 2016!!!

I can’t make excuses…I didn’t stick to blogging like I said I would. Quite frankly, I suck at it. But I’m learning.

I had an awesome information interview this morning. A lot of great reinforcement to help motivate my career.

Social media demands me to be more social savvy, so I’ll try and share blog posts.

Also, I’ll try to write down my ideas instead of holding them in. Lord knows I have a ton of them.

Thanks to those that read and follow my blog, and I hope to keep the machine going for you all.

 

Elijah B.

 

Jammin’ while You Write

While jogging has nothing to do with my blog, it compares to my writing.

How?

When I jog, I brainstorm. I let the images of my imagination burst into the adrenaline giving me the energy to survive the five miles in one hour. I have to admit that the best ideas show themselves when I’m on my feet.

The secret ingredient behind the infinite ideas is music–an entity that allows me create epic movie trailers every four minutes. Each slam of the drum, every strum of the guitar takes a character through a miniature journey which seems to last a lifetime during the small fraction of time given by each song.

I don’t know about the rest of the writers and readers out there, but Video Game and Rock music happens to be the go to sound to bring forth the fantasy world while Hip-Hop pushes the envelop of urban grit. At the end of it all, my mind’s eye stares down this mass universe that I can’t seem to comprehend how I will put it on paper during one lifetime.

To be specific, my playlist consists of music from Koei Tecmo’s Dynasty Warriors, Alter Bridge, T.I., and an assorted list of OCRemix. Each song serves a particular pace. As y’all might have guessed, T.I. and Alter Bridge is responsible for the adrenaline pumping sound that makes my teeth grind and my breath puff like a cartoonish bull.

Dynasty Warriors’ music is for the long haul. I really put my mind through a simulated battle. Sparks become a collection of synapse creating an thick yet smooth air from my lungs to the sweat rolling on my salty skin.

Remixed game music takes me through a fluctuating adventure of breathing. I have to make a decision…Do I explode during something harmonious? I’ll regret it later if I do.

Point is that writing takes me through the same exercise as jogging. As music feeds my ears with organized noise and verses, my fingers fill the page with a sketch, which I eventually fill with inspiration, precision, and consideration. Of course, it’s not healthy to blast the music against the sensitive eardrum, so I take it easy–stop a few cycles–and explode in a barrage of words that can potentially draw the reader into the universe I imagined when I placed the balls of toes on the ground.

Elance: The Battle Royal of the Self-Employed

The other day, I was so frustrated with the lack of writing and editing jobs in my area. I searched through job board advanced searches and got nothing. I should be accustomed to the disappointment by now.

I did something I didn’t think I would ever have to do. Actually, it’s something I didn’t want to do.

I joined Elance. I’ll admit that I had the wrong idea about Elance–I really should have joined sooner.

As soon as I entered, I saw the intimidating list of names competing for jobs I knew I could do. The problem is that Elance clients don’t know my skills, so I have to present my expertise in a fashion that screams “I am that guy!” And the competitor is doing the same. After a while you get a barrage of service sellers, wrestling over the job ad with words, prices, and experience.

The newcomers are thrown over the ropes, while the veterans tackle the client in the ratings and number of jobs completed. Unfortunately, I’m in the newcomer group. I have the motivation and skill; however, clients tend to favor the all-stars.

I won’t give up! I’ll keep submitting proposals!

Writing Courses: Hanif Kureishi sees them as a waste

Hanif Kureishi, author of Buddha of Suburbia, recently told “theguardian” that creative writing courses are “a waste of time.”

Here is the http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/mar/04/creative-writing-courses-waste-of-time-hanif-kureishi

I responded to a LinkedIn group called Books and Writers…

If writing courses didn’t help, higher education and seminar directors wouldn’t teach them. I think the first part of the article describes a frustrated professor who has placed his students in a master-level pool, which is unfair. Haig may agree as his quote states that Kureishi’s comments were cruel and wrong; however, Kureishi’s comments can be translated as tough love. Hurt feelings can develop into improvement if you let it.

I spent most of my college career writing creative fiction, creative non-fiction, and print journalism news. The only thing that prevented good, enjoyable writing was laziness. I agree with Kureishi’s comment that writing is very slow. Good, concise and fun writing is done when you develop to near perfection, which takes time. Professors do teach this to students, but the students must be willing to read, write, and edit.

As far as having a successful book, I don’t know much about that yet. I’m trying to break into that now. But everyday I contemplate how hard I should push my ideas. Better yet, when should I show them to the reader? To say I’m ready now would be a lie. So I read, listen to advice, or do something to push the craft into enjoyable literature.